Service Tree

The Service Tree lists all services in "branched" groups, starting with the very general and moving to the very specific. Click on the name of any group name to see the sub-groups available within it. Click on a service code to see its details and the providers who offer that service.

Disaster Related Clothing/Emergency Supplies

Programs that provide clothing, blankets and other essentials immediately following a major disaster or large-scale emergency for people who have experienced substantial losses as a result of the incident.

Disaster Related Shelter Services

Programs that arrange for shelter and/or a warm place for people to stay when dangerously cold weather is expected; and/or provide emergency shelter for people who have no place to stay as a result of a large-scale fire, flood, earthquake, tornado, hurricane, or a localized incident such as a house fire, toxic spill emergency or other environmental hazard that disrupts the normal functioning of a community.

Disaster Survivor Inquiries

Programs conducted by organizations like the American Red Cross that provide a communication network which enables the general public to obtain information about the circumstances of relatives and friends who are in an area within the U.S. where a major disaster or wide-spread emergency has occurred. Also included are disaster survivor registries that allow individuals who are alive following a disaster to post their name and medical condition for access by family members and friends; or to leave voice messages providing information about their circumstances, their current location and how to reach them.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

A federal program that provides financial assistance to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted as a direct result of a major disaster declared by the President of the United States in situations where they are ineligible for regular unemployment insurance benefits (under any state or federal law). Disaster Unemployment Assistance is available to individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning with the first week following the date the major disaster began and for up to 26 weeks after the major disaster was declared by the President, as long as their unemployment continues to be a result of the incident. The maximum weekly benefit amount is determined under the provisions of the state law for unemployment insurance in the state where the disaster occurred. The program is administered by states as agents of the federal government.

Extreme Cold Warming Centers

Programs that provide daytime or evening access to heated facilities during times of extreme cold for people who are temporarily at risk for exposure due to a power failure, fuel shortage, road closure, homelessness or other situations which make them vulnerable.

Extreme Heat Cooling Programs

Programs that provide access to air conditioned facilities, extend the hours during which public swimming pools and local spray grounds are open, activate street shower sites or take other steps to protect the public’s health during dangerously hot weather. Some communities operate hotlines that residents can call if they see people on the street who are in distress due to the heat so that vans can be dispatched to take victims to cooling centers or other places of shelter. At greatest risk during heat emergencies are older adults, young children, individuals with compromised immune systems and people who take certain types of medication. Existing health conditions such as chronic illness, hypertension, circulatory problems, and obesity can also heighten an individual’s vulnerability.

General Disaster Information

Programs that provide general information for the public about major disasters and large-scale emergencies occurring within the U.S. Details may include the location and severity of the incident, the date and time of its occurrence, organizations that concerned friends and family can contact for information about the circumstances of possible victims and/or survivors, details regarding needed materials and supplies, and instructions for contributing to relief organizations.

Post Disaster Child Care

Programs that go into areas that have been devastated by a major disaster or large-scale emergency and set up temporary child care facilities to meet the needs of young children whose families have been affected by the disaster and need time to reorganize their personal affairs.

Post Disaster Food Services

Programs that meet the basic nutritional needs of relief workers and/or individuals and families whose homes have been made uninhabitable by a disaster or large scale emergency and who have no other means of purchasing food and/or preparing a meal. Food assistance may also available to individuals who have experienced a localized incident such as a house fire.

Post Disaster Mental Health Services

Programs that provide a variety of services following a major disaster or large-scale emergency which help individuals cope with their own psychological reactions to the incident and/or prepare them to provide emotional support for family members, friends and neighbors who are feeling frightened, confused and no longer in control of their lives because of the event.

Post Disaster Points of Distribution

Places designated by the local emergency management agency where the public can pick up emergency supplies such as food, water and ice following a disaster. PODS may also serve as sites for distribution of antibiotics or other medication in health emergencies.

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